Book review: The Mastery

Mastery – a guide to discovering the inner force and principles for achieving mastery in any field or activity. It does not dive into the specific areas or skill sets but instead distills a set of general principles that one must follow on their path to achieving mastery in a field or subject of their choice.

The book is very dense in the material it presents. You could unpack each chapter for hours and dive into them deeper with more books and materials. What helps for the book to stay clear on the message and follow along is the format it chose. It expresses the principles by looking at contemporary and historical figures that were highly influential and respected personas in music, business, and technology and weaves all principles in mini stories that are easy to isolate and dissect.

The common theme of the book is that we all posses the ability to be great. It is not about the talent; it is not about “born genius,” or mystical powers. Luck plays a great role in our lives and cannot be dismissed. But you have to be prepared to accept and use luck to turn into anything meaningful. You have to be ready to receive it before it can make an impact on you. Through it all, it is all about hard work and more work, tactical plans combined with an ability to be flexible with a capacity to learn from others and stay on course despite the challenges that the life will present you.

It all starts with the process. First, you need to know what your big goal is. What are you trying to achieve? What is that you are trying to become? It is a difficult thing to define, and you need to spend time thinking about this deeply. Sometimes we get lucky, and we just know in our hearts what we want to do. In that case, the big goal is already defined, otherwise work to set it.

Second follows an immense practice and learning of your field or subject of interest. Not superficial tutorial here and there but full immersion and intentional practice. We need to anticipate that once the initial excitement wears off, the difference will be our ability to stick around and continue to study, learn, and practice the field. Push hard, let go, relax, push hard, let go, relax, push hard, let go relax … a cycle that will get you working hard and at the same time keeping you re-energized for more. The key is that each time you learn something, more unknowns open up and you continue to dig deep to understand the field or whatever it is that you are trying to master. The practice must be deliberate, that is with a goal in mind, and each stage has to have a purpose behind it. It’s a challenging work, but the rewards can be great.

During this time you must be strong enough to deal with self-doubt and potential criticism of others. Accept it but don’t get discouraged. Another roadblock here could be people close to you that will advise you against going for something big and steer you towards fields or topics that have quick short term gain but usually are dead-end occupations or endevours that will leave you unsatisfied. You need to find the calling that attracts you, that also is useful to the world, and then go after it.

All of the hard work is for one goal: developing of intuition. The greater the mastery, the better the intuition. There is a feel that gets developed that hints to you what approach is right and what is wrong. The deep intuition also helps you develop the connections between the subjects and fields that deepen the learning AND fuel the discovery. This is why the people that are in the field for a long time can know right away what the issues are, can solve them fast, and move past the complicated concepts in their field. The intuition is guiding them along th way.

You can enlist the help of mentors to accelerate your development. If mentors are being available, the next best thing is books and learning materials. The key is to be tactical about what is being studied and the approach that is used. The mentors can be incredible accelerators of the development and are highly recommended to be seeked out. Unfortunately in this area I have no experience as I have only occassionally encountered somebody who I could call a mentor in some capacity. The book advices on how to find such a person, how to approach it, and how to work under them. Don’t expect the mentor to have you as their primary concern. Instead you have to be creating some sort of value for the mentor in exchange for the mentorship. At the end, don’t be surprised when your hard work is taken over or adapted by the mentor. It is OK, and can happen. Accept it and expect it. And then if you follow the right path you will outgrow the mentor and move past it. The key is to recognize when that time comes and move on.

Another section that was immensily helpful and I found very useful was the section on social intelligence. Along the way to mastery, you will work with other people and organizations. The ability to read and navigate social situations is as useful as knowledge itself. Knowledge in a vacuum is useless. It has to be presented to others, allowed for others to take it apart and criticize it. Beware that at the end, people only care about themselves so potential “political” meddling and situations can arise. I love the book’s advice on it: expect it, embrace it, and move away from it. Don’t play “political” games if the goal is the mastery and gaining the knowledge. Instead, be prepared for it in a way that it does not surprise you or blind side you and do your own thing.

Overall the book was a great read. I have a feeling that I will be coming back to it from time to time. Also, just picked up a few of other Greene’s books that have similar rave reviews as Mastery. Here is to more reading and learning!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *